Pollution Sources:
Automobile
Residents
Agriculture
Urban
Construction
Businesses
Storm Drains

Information:
Salt Lake
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Recycle
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Automobile Pollution

Causes:
Automobile Pollutants
Automobiles include cars, trucks, motorcycles and boats (anything that burns gas). They leave oil, antifreeze, grease and metals on streets and driveways. They also emit nitrogen and other contaminants, which settle in water. Americans dump enough oil to contaminate about 1.5 trillion gallons of water every year. Also, many car washing detergents contain phosphorus.
Effects:
Oil, petroleum products and other toxins from automobiles kill fish, plants, aquatic life and even people. One quart of oil will contaminate thousands of gallons of water because it doesn't dissolve. These toxins as well as trace metals and degreasing agents used on automobiles contaminate drinking water and can cause major illness. Some of these toxins and metals are absorbed in various sea life and cause medical problems to people when eaten. Phosphorus and nitrogen cause explosive growth of algae, which depletes water of oxygen, killing fish and aquatic life.
Solutions:

Oil Leak

car wash

  • Reduce use, and car pool.


  • Monitor and repair any leaks.


  • Always take used oil, batteries and other fluids to a repair shop for proper disposal.


  • Never allow oil or other toxins to runoff into the ground, street gutters or storm drains.


  • Take your car to a commercial car wash or use detergents that don't contain phosphorus to wash your car and direct the flow of runoff to grass clippings or gravel instead of the street.
  • Click here to learn Best Management Practices for washing your car and parking lot.

  • When purchasing a new automobile look for cars with high fuel efficiency ratings.


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This project was originally jointly funded by a Federal Clean Water Act grant from the U.S. EPA
the Hawaii State Department of Health Clean Water Branch
and the City and County of Honolulu Department of Environmental Services.